When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost his Brain by Giles Milton.

Book Review by Cari Mayhew.

If only all events in history could be taught this way! This is his hands down one of the most entertaining history books you’ll ever read!  The book is composed of 50 chapters depicting from lesser known points in history.  The stories are dramatic, compelling, and often shocking.  There are tales of heroism, injustice, conspiracy, and cannibalism. Continue reading When Hitler Took Cocaine and Lenin Lost his Brain by Giles Milton.

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Mine by Susi Fox.

Book Review by Cari Mayhew.

This story has a promising premise – the central character, a young woman wakes up from a Caesarean section not believing that baby labelled as hers, a premature babe struggling in a special humidcrib, really is hers. Continue reading Mine by Susi Fox.

This Idea Must Die – Edited by John Brockman.

Book Review by Cari Mayhew.

There’s nothing like reading a popular science book to make you feel more worldly wise!  The Idea Must Die is a compilation of over 150 separate articles, by different contributors, arguing that certain scientific concepts are blocking progress and should be put to rest.  Continue reading This Idea Must Die – Edited by John Brockman.

Not Thomas by Sarah Gethin.

Book Review by Cari Mayhew.

This is such a sad story I often struggled to bring myself to read it.  The novel is written as if it were a true story told by the central character, 5-year-old Tomos.  Tomos has just moved in with his birth mother, following a long period of foster care which came to an end when the foster parent died. Continue reading Not Thomas by Sarah Gethin.

Starved For You by Margaret Atwood.

Book Review by Cari Mayhew.

Margaret Atwood certainly has a knack for imagining novel structures of society!  In this semi-dystopian setting, civilized society is struggling, and people are encouraged to opt in to living in a prison every other month, and living as normal civilians on the alternate months. Continue reading Starved For You by Margaret Atwood.